Tag Archives: about: 2015 in review

2015 in Review: #2 & #1

ID-10088833

With another year drawn to a close, I wanted to take some time this month to go back and highlight some of the best books that I read in 2015. I didn’t read quite as many this year as I did last year (287 vs. 306), but I attribute that to taking on proofreading (which is a slower read for a book) and starting a certificate program during the final quarter of the year. Still, I’m happy with the total. But enough about that…onto the books I wanted to take a moment to revisit…

Note: These are the best books I read in 2015, not necessarily published in 2015.

#2 Greenwode (The Wode, Book 1) by J. Tullos Hennig

23571391

Perhaps the absolute best retelling of the Robin Hood story in existence! Not going to post much more here, as this is one where I tried to keep spoilers to a minimum. This simply just has to be experienced (I also may have gifted a copy or two for Christmas to people I thought might enjoy it).

Read my review from May 28 for more on this title.

#1 A Darker Shade of Magic (A Darker Shade of Magic, Book 1) by V.E. Schwab

A Darker Shade final for Irene

In a world of parallel universes, there is one constant: London. Though every world is very different, they all have a city named London in the same place and it serves as the loose thread that holds them all together. And the thread is loose because there are only a few who can travel between them. Kell is one such Traveler, and has become the ambassador (and an adoptee) of the royalty of Red London to carry correspondence back and forth with Grey London and White London. But on his visits, Kell engages in a hobby of smuggling artifacts back and forth, despite the objections and warnings of his adopted brother. But neither of them know the true extent of the trouble Kell might wade into without even thinking…

Read my review from April 27 for more on this title.

2015 in Review: #4 & #3

ID-10088833

With another year drawn to a close, I wanted to take some time this month to go back and highlight some of the best books that I read in 2015. I didn’t read quite as many this year as I did last year (287 vs. 306), but I attribute that to taking on proofreading (which is a slower read for a book) and starting a certificate program during the final quarter of the year. Still, I’m happy with the total. But enough about that…onto the books I wanted to take a moment to revisit…

Note: These are the best books I read in 2015, not necessarily published in 2015.

#4 Prickly Business (Portland Pack Chronicles, Book 1) by Piper Vaughn & Keznie Cade

25462873

Avery Babineaux is definitely unique. A hedgehog shifter from a wealthy Louisiana family, he’s chosen to live his life away from his family and among the Portland wolf pack. Life is fairly easy for him, though, as he’s able to live off an allowance from his parents and never wants for the nice things he’s used to. In fact, he’s so used to nice things that he cast of Dylan Green, a member of the Portland pack and Avery’s apparently fated mate. Dylan is just a blue collar mechanic, after all. But when Avery gets himself into trouble with some seedier shifters and puts the steady stream of family money in jeopardy, he’s forced to finally fend for himself and, though very reluctant, may actually have to ask others for help. In the process, he stumbles onto the case of a missing pack member and quickly finds himself falling down a hole that he just might not be able to climb out of–unless, just maybe, Dylan will help him out…

Read my review from July 28 for more on this title.

#3 Shirewode (The Wode, Book 2) by J. Tullos Hennig

Shirewode by J. Tullos Hennig

His family gone and his home destroyed, Rob was left for dead and that should have been his fate. Except fate decided it wasn’t his time. So he takes to the Wode, taking up the mantle of the Horned Lord, and doing his best to defend the few of his people left and the surrounding villages from the corrupt government and the church. Thinking Rob was lost, Gamelyn complied with forced exile by his brother and joined the Knights Templar. But now he has returned on a very specific mission, and he won’t let much stand in his way. Even when the two find each other again, their past may not be enough to break down the walls of pain that have built up between them. Except there is one thing that might be able to bring them back together–Marion is alive…

Read my review from October 12 for more on this title.

2015 in Review: #6 & #5

ID-10088833

With another year drawn to a close, I wanted to take some time this month to go back and highlight some of the best books that I read in 2015. I didn’t read quite as many this year as I did last year (287 vs. 306), but I attribute that to taking on proofreading (which is a slower read for a book) and starting a certificate program during the final quarter of the year. Still, I’m happy with the total. But enough about that…onto the books I wanted to take a moment to revisit…

Note: These are the best books I read in 2015, not necessarily published in 2015.

#6 Prairie Silence: A Memoir by Melanie Hoffert

13641970

While Melanie Hoffert was quick to leave her North Dakota home when she got the chance, she has always felt a longing for everything that said home represents. There’s a dissonance between the comforting aspects of home and family and the silence that it imposes on those who may not fit the expectations of their community. But Melanie is determined to explore this disconnect and try to reconcile these aspects of her life and self, planning to spend a harvest at home helping on the farm. Her journey is one of self-discovery, learning things about her friends and family she hadn’t noticed before, and understanding what it means to call the prairie home, even if it’s not where you will live out your days.

Read my review from June 18 for more on this title.

#5 The Perfect Game by Leslie Dana Kirby

22965834

Lauren Rose feels like her life is coming together.  She just moved to Phoenix to start her medical residency, and is once again living closer to her sister and their grandmother.  While residency will certainly be stressful, being near family and putting school behind her means a welcome change.  But when her sister, Liz, is found murdered at her home, Lauren begins to realize that maybe things won’t go as well as she hoped.  Still somewhat new to the city, she doesn’t know many people and finds herself seeking support from her late sister’s husband, famous baseball player Jake Wakefield.  She doesn’t know Jake very well, either, but he’s a shoulder to lean on when the police begin to suspect Lauren of the brutal crime…

Read my review from March 3 for more on this title.

2015 in Review: #8 & #7

ID-10088833

With another year drawn to a close, I wanted to take some time this month to go back and highlight some of the best books that I read in 2015. I didn’t read quite as many this year as I did last year (287 vs. 306), but I attribute that to taking on proofreading (which is a slower read for a book) and starting a certificate program during the final quarter of the year. Still, I’m happy with the total. But enough about that…onto the books I wanted to take a moment to revisit…

Note: These are the best books I read in 2015, not necessarily published in 2015.

#8 The Death Cure (The Maze Runner, Book 3) by James Dashner

7864437

The Gladers (or at least some of them) have done it.  They made it through the Maze.  They survived the Scorch.  And now their trials are finally over.  But some of them are sure things don’t seem quite right.  Can they trust WICKED?  Is there more going on here than they’ve been told?  And what exactly is WICKED’s endgame?  Will the truth really set them free?

Read my review from April 17 for more on this title.

NB: I’m really disappointed that I won’t get to see this story on film. The way they completely destroyed the trilogy storyline in the film version of The Scorch Trials was a huge blow to this book’s adaptation. Since, to me, it was the strongest of the series, I feel like they’ve killed the best opportunity they had with these books. Oh, well. Hollywood.

#7 The Martian by Andy Weir

20829029

Within days of landing on Mars, the crew of the Ares 3 mission is forced to abandon the planet due to a strong sandstorm. In the course of evacuating, astronaut Mark Watney is hit with an antenna and dies. But while sensors indicated he was dead to the crew, they were wrong. Watney has survived and has been left behind with no way of communicating with the crew or with NASA back on Earth and definitely not enough supplies to make it until the Ares 4 crew arrives on the planet years from now. But he’s not one to just give up without trying and plans to use both his engineering and botany training to see just how long he can make it and if there might be some way to let those back at home know he is okay.

Read my review from January 17 for more on this title.

2015 in Review: #10 & #9

ID-10088833

With another year drawn to a close, I wanted to take some time this month to go back and highlight some of the best books that I read in 2015. I didn’t read quite as many this year as I did last year (287 vs. 306), but I attribute that to taking on proofreading (which is a slower read for a book) and starting a certificate program during the final quarter of the year. Still, I’m happy with the total. But enough about that…onto the books I wanted to take a moment to revisit…

Note: These are the best books I read in 2015, not necessarily published in 2015.

#10 What You Left Behind by Samantha Hayes

22747926

Detective Inspector Lorraine Fisher is off on holiday to visit her sister, whose husband has just left her. Lorraine is used to helping her sister through things like this, but she is hardly prepared for everything waiting for her when she arrives in Radcote. The village saw a spate of youth suicides just two years ago, and there are fears it may be starting again as another young man has died in an apparent suicide. On top of that, Lorraine’s nephew, Freddie, has been acting strangely and his mother is concerned about him. And when a second suicide is reported not long after Lorraine’s arrival, she can’t help but try to get to the bottom of what’s going on in the village.

Read my review from May 10 for more on this title.

#9 Mad About the Hatter by Dakota Chase

25926238

Henry refused to believe the stories his sister, Alice, would tell about visiting a place called “Wonderland.” After all, there was no way that such a place could exist. Yet, she insisted, and her insistence only served to drive a wedge right through their entire family. But when he finds himself suddenly in an unfamiliar place, he remembers that his sister told him to “find the Hatter.” He’s not sure what it means, and when Hatter arrives he thinks he may just regret asking after him, but it’s all he has to work with.

Hatter–yes, that Hatter–faces certain execution. The Red Queen has made it clear she wants his head to roll, and there seems to be no escape. But when the Queen learns of the presence of “Boy Alice” in Wonderland, Hatter may just have the opportunity to do her a favor and save his head…literally. And why wouldn’t he gladly serve up the cantankerous “Boy Alice” to do just that.

But can Hatter really give someone else up to save himself? And might Henry’s first impressions of the Hatter soften as they journey together through this strange land? Regardless, both Henry and the Hatter are about to learn there is much more to this situation than either of them ever could have imagined.

Read my review from August 19 for more on this title.