Tag Archives: genre: non-fiction

What Happened by Hillary Rodham Clinton

What Happened

What Happened by Hillary Rodham Clinton

Published by: Simon & Schuster on September 12, 2017
Rating: 4 stars (★★★★☆)

In what can only be described as a candid and open narrative, Hillary Rodham Clinton shares with readers her thoughts, experiences, and feelings during the course of the 2016 Presidential Election. Covering everything from what influenced her decision to run in the first place and the momentum of her campaign to what was going through her head during the debates and how she handled election night and the time since her unexpected and unprecedented loss

Before picking this up, I had heard the commentary that this was just Hillary listing out excuses for her loss, but it is not that at all. There’s a sense of honesty in the narrative, while the author is clear to recognize that what readers are getting her perspective and opinion. But when one considers how much the media was focused on her opponent during the election cycle (and he always told everyone exactly what he was thinking), it provides a balance to the existing public narrative. I personally also found it to be an inspiring read–I’m quite glad I picked it up.

Insight by Tasha Eurich

Insight

Insight: Why We’re Not as Self-Aware as We Think, and How Seeing Ourselves Clearly Helps Us Succeed at Work and in Life by Tasha Eurich

Published by: Crown on May 2, 2017
Rating: 4 stars (★★★★☆)

Self-awareness has become somewhat of a buzzword in the business and education sectors. And it seems to make sense. After all, the way we work with others, the way we lead, and the way we work to deliver results all comes back to understanding who we are and how others perceive us. But self-awareness is not simply acquired through a little light introspection and then calling it good. As Tasha Eurich points out in this book, self-awareness is developed and refined over time, and it often involves doing some work that is uncomfortable and sometimes undesirable. But when one considers that leaders and teams who lack self-awareness consistency perform a much lower levels than those who exhibit healthier levels of self-awareness, it is something that cannot be ignored. The more self-aware individual is not only more productive and fulfilled at work, but they also tend to be happier outside of work and more likely to achieve their personal goals. Eurich provides a number of strategies that readers can use to develop their own self-awareness while also offering tactics for dealing with those we encounter in work and in life who are not self-aware (and especially those who have no apparent desire to get there, either).

[Disclaimer: This review is based on a copy of the book provided by the publisher via Blogging For Books.]