Tag Archives: series: all’s fair

Fair Chance by Josh Lanyon

Fair Chance

Fair Chance by Josh Lanyon

Series: All’s Fair, Book 3
Published by: Carina Press on March 13, 2017
Rating: 3 stars (★★★☆☆)

Former FBI agent, Elliot Mills, thought he’d left his crime-fighting life behind. But when he fell right into the middle of the path of a serial killer, he found out it wasn’t that simple. And even though the culprit was apprehended, it turns out it’s still not over. The Sculptor may not have been acting alone. And he is all to happy to draw Elliot back into the path of the storm–much to the dismay of his partner, Special Agent Tucker Lance. Danger threatens them both, and it might be the thing that pulls them apart forever. But if they can make it through alive, could it also be the thing that pushes them together once and for all?

I found myself wrestling with this one a little. It was an interesting read, but it felt a bit like trying to hang on to the story of the previous book. At times it felt like a new chapter, and at times it felt like a continuation. And it was a bit more predictable than I’m used to seeing from one of Lanyon’s books. I think part of it is that I was wanting to see the Sculptor behind them with the chance for them to focus on moving forward. Maybe if there’s another book?

[Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley.]

Fair Play by Josh Lanyon

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Title: Fair Play (All’s Fair, Book 2)
Author: Josh Lanyon
Published: November 10, 2014
Publisher: Carina Press
Pages: 250

Rating: ★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
Review:
Elliot Mills hoped that he’d left his crime-solving life behind after leaving the FBI and becoming a college professor. He was wrong. But surely after he found himself wrapped up in a serial killer case that almost led to his own death, he’s done with all of that. When his father’s house catches fire in the middle of the night and the investigators immediately suspect arson, he Elliot knows he’s deep into it again. But who could want to harm his father? Considering his father’s anti-government antics in his youth, it turns out that list might be longer than Elliot thinks. And with things just starting to settle between Elliot and his former FBI partner turned live-in boyfriend, Tucker, there’s an added layer of complication to Elliot’s attempts to help ensure his father is safe and to keep his relationship on solid footing.

I have to start out by saying that I liked this better than the first installment in the series. In part, I think it helps jumping in when Elliot and Tucker’s relationship is better established and there’s some consistency there between them. I also felt like this one was a bit more plot/story-driven than Fair Game, which made it a bit more suspenseful and engaging. And I love a mystery that can keep me guessing until as close to the reveal as possible – which is something that Fair Play certainly delivers. Fans of Josh Lanyon will definitely love this, but anyone who is interested in a good mystery with a healthy side of M/M romance (and some sexual tension in that relationship) is sure to enjoy it, too.

(eGalley provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.)

Title: Fair Game
Author: Josh Lanyon
Publication Date: August 1, 2010

Rating: ★ ★ ★  ☆
Review: 
I’m a fan of Josh Lanyon’s murder mysteries. They’re always well-written, engaging, and have just enough twists to keep me guessing. Fair Game is certainly no exception. The characters are dynamic and the world they live in is made very real. I found myself enjoying this one, even during those few moments when I wanted to say ‘okay, maybe this is a bit more out there than the story needed to go’ in terms of realism. I’d recommend picking it up.

I always appreciate stories set in real settings when the author truly does their research and lets it show in the writing. But I’m a bit thrown when there’s a miss like there was in this book. At one point it’s mentioned that Ballard is ten minutes from Seattle – Ballard is actually in Seattle. Small detail but impacted the realism a bit here…